Encyclopedia of Psychology and Religion

2014 Edition
| Editors: David A. Leeming

Drives

  • Stefanie TeitelbaumEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-6086-2_186

Introduction

Freud used the words instinkt (instinct) and treib (drive) seemingly without organized differentiation. Opposing forces or dualism characterized Freud’s thoughts about instinct, in both the nature of the instinct itself and in the source of the force as being of the mind or the body. Freudian instinct differs from strictly biological instinct in the uniquely human consciousness to mentalize the pressure to respond to a sometimes consistent presence of an urge with or without identifiable stimulus. The vast variety of urges to act within the human species, sometimes deemed pathological, might also suggest forces not strictly rooted in the body.

Drive, as used in Freudian psychoanalysis, does not have a distinct role in religious/psychological literature. Religious texts referring to pressure to act generally speak of instinct or inclination, sometimes conceived as divinely implanted.

Psychoanalysis

Freud conceived the instincts as amoral. The psychical forces taming,...

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Bibliography

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of NPAP (National Psychological Association for Psychoanalysis)IEA (Institute for Expressive Analysis)New YorkUSA