Renewable Energy Systems

2013 Edition
| Editors: Martin Kaltschmitt, Nickolas J. Themelis, Lucien Y. Bronicki, Lennart Söder, Luis A. Vega

Waste-to-Energy Ash Management in the United States

Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-5820-3_882

Definition of the Subject

Municipal solid waste (MSW) contains organics that can be converted to heat and power and should not be wasted by dumping in landfills. However, waste-to-energy (WTE) ash residues contain substances that have the potential to contaminate the environment. Management of ash residues therefore requires procedures that assure placement in landfills wherein leachate is collected, or treated to minimize the toxicity of the residues, possibly for beneficial use.

Regulations for management of ash residues have developed differently in various countries, in accordance with the physical and political situation and also the costs of the alternatives. Procedures used by WTE facilities in the USA require testing of the combined residues from the stoker, boiler, and emission control system to ensure meeting established federal and state regulations. Most of the “combined” ash produced in the USA is disposed in sanitary landfills as Alternative Daily Cover and for other...

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Hasselriis AssociatesForest HillsUSA