Renewable Energy Systems

2013 Edition
| Editors: Martin Kaltschmitt, Nickolas J. Themelis, Lucien Y. Bronicki, Lennart Söder, Luis A. Vega

Waste-to-Energy: Fluidized Bed Technology

  • Franz P. Neubacher
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-5820-3_405

Definition of the Subject and Its Importance

Waste is a complex issue. Disposal of waste in terms of “out of sight – out of mind” by burial on land or discharging into surface waters or by simple dumping onsite or in proximity of the origin of waste production has become a dramatic global problem and a cause for various forms of environmental degradation and severe damage to human health and the natural environment including fauna and flora. Increasing population and material wealth based on industrial production has led to tremendous waste problems. It has also led to greater understanding and the acknowledgment of resource limitations for an increasing human population on this planet. Therefore, the practice of dumping or disposal of waste must be viewed as wasteful, neglectful, and irresponsible to the needs of others and to those of future generations. It can also be viewed as a direct contradiction to “cultivating the earth” (the original concept for the human population...

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.UV&P Environmental Engineering M.S. Chemical Engineering (T.U. Graz) M.S. Technology & Policy (M.I.T)ViennaAustria