Sustainable Food Production

2013 Edition
| Editors: Paul Christou, Roxana Savin, Barry A. Costa-Pierce, Ignacy Misztal, C. Bruce A. Whitelaw

Animal Genetic in Environment Interaction

Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-5797-8_343

Definition of the Subject

The existence of genotype by environment interaction (G×E) makes animal breeding more complicated. It means that the same genotype is not the best in all environments, and it implies that separate breeding programs might be needed to cater for these different environments. However, separate (and therefore, smaller) breeding programs might be less efficient than one large program. Small breeding programs might also encounter problems with inbreeding depression, but on the other hand, several populations with different breeding programs and breeding goals might increase the overall genetic diversity. Therefore, G×E is an important factor to consider when creating breeding programs for animals, especially in a global setting.

Introduction

The ability to respond to changes in the environment is a vital characteristic of all organisms. This ability is called phenotypic plasticity or sometimes, environmental sensitivitysensitivity . Genetic variation in...

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Animal Breeding and GeneticsSwedish University of Agricultural SciencesUppsalaSweden