Encyclopedia of Criminology and Criminal Justice

2014 Edition
| Editors: Gerben Bruinsma, David Weisburd

History of Geographic Criminology Part II: Twentieth Century

Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-5690-2_650

Overview

After the turn of the century, the locus of geographic research on crime moved to the United States, and especially to the city of Chicago. A group of American sociologists, among them Robert Park, William Thomas, Louis Wirth, Ernest Burgess, Clifford Shaw, and Henry McKay, took a leadership role in the development of the criminology of place, in contrast to the statisticians, criminal lawyers, or psychiatrists who dominated criminology more generally in Europe (see entry on the  History of Geographic Criminology Part I: Nineteenth Century). New theoretical concepts were introduced (notably social disorganization) and innovative methods and techniques to study empirically the distribution of crime in cities. In the 1950s, methodological critiques and developments in other areas of criminology diminished the research attention to geographic criminology. In the 1980s, young scholars reemerged the study of spatial issues studying the dynamics of neighborhoods, elaborating the...

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Netherlands Institute for the Study of Crime and Law Enforcement (NSCR)AmsterdamThe Netherlands
  2. 2.VU University AmsterdamAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  3. 3.Department of Criminology, Law and SocietyGeorge Mason UniversityFairfaxUSA
  4. 4.Faculty of LawThe Hebrew University Mt. ScopusJerusalemIsrael