Encyclopedia of Criminology and Criminal Justice

2014 Edition
| Editors: Gerben Bruinsma, David Weisburd

Agent-Based Modeling for Understanding Patterns of Crime

  • Elizabeth R GroffEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-5690-2_476

Synonyms

Overview

Many questions in criminology focus on dynamic processes and individual decision-making. For example, crime events represent the end result of a multitude of decisions made by a variety of different people in the context of specific situations. Potential offenders, potential victims, police, and other informal guardians of places make choices that bring them together at the same place and time. However, data describing any of those individual decisions prior to, during, and after the crime event are only rarely available and never complete. Once at a place, potential victims may take actions that make them a more suitable target. Potential offenders observe these actions and reevaluate the likelihood of getting away with a crime. At the same time, likely offenders also notice the actions of potential guardians and make adjustments. Even if data were collected to document the actions of individuals, the dynamic and nonlinear nature...

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Temple UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA