Encyclopedia of Criminology and Criminal Justice

2014 Edition
| Editors: Gerben Bruinsma, David Weisburd

Monetary Strain and Individual Offending

Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-5690-2_214

Overview

Monetary strain theories, including anomie and general strain perspectives, outline that individuals who are unable to reach monetary goals utilizing legal channels, or who are experiencing negative economic circumstances, will be more likely to engage in a range of illegal activities. The probability of an illegal response is strengthened when individuals perceive their opportunities to achieve the monetary goal to be blocked, attribute the cause of their failure to external sources, and feel deprived relative to the others with whom they compare themselves. The failure to reach the monetary goal, or the negative economic experience, in these situations leads to frustration, dissatisfaction, and anger. These negative emotions supply the incentive for individuals to utilize numerous illegal avenues that focus on financial gain to facilitate the realization of monetary goals or address negative economic circumstances. Individuals experiencing monetary strain may also strike out...

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Recommended Reading and References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of SociologyQueen’s UniversityKingstonCanada