Encyclopedia of Critical Psychology

2014 Edition
| Editors: Thomas Teo

Drive, Overview

Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-5583-7_671

Introduction

The notion of the drive has a long history, even though it is nowadays mostly identified as a psychoanalytic concept. In politika Aristotle speaks of two basic drives – one for procreation and another aiming for self-preservation (ca. 335 BC, I 2, 1252a27–30) – to explain the order and development of human social groups in relation to the family/household (oikos) and to slavery. This figure is picked up by medieval clerics in the discussion of sexual practice and the meaning of marriage. While sexual lust as an end in itself would clearly lead into peril, as Thomas Aquinas argues in Summa Theologiae, the longing for begetting children is enrooted within a natural human drive and therefore to be endorsed (written 1265, 1266, 1267, 1268, 1269, 1270, 1271, 1272, 1273, 1274, II-I, q. 94, a. 2). In German Idealism the notion of the drive becomes a contested concept: While Kant discusses determinants and motives of human agency as drives in the way of a purely natural aptitude,...

This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access

References

  1. Adorno, T. W. (1952). Die revidierte Psychoanalyse. In Gesammelte Schriften (Vol. 8, pp. 20–41). Frankfurt a. M.: Suhrkamp.Google Scholar
  2. Adorno, T. W. (1955). Sociology and psychology I. New Left Review, 46 (1967), 67–80 & Sociology and psychology II. New Left Review, 47(1966), 79–97.Google Scholar
  3. Aquinas, T. (written 1265–1274). Summa Theologiae. London: Blackfriars 1966–1974.Google Scholar
  4. Aristotle (ca. 335 BC): Politika [Politics]. In J. Barnes (Ed.), The complete works of Aristotle. The revised Oxford translation (Bollingen Series) (Vol. 2). Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  5. de Beauvoir, S. (1949). The second sex. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1954.Google Scholar
  6. Ferenczi, S. (1932). The confusion of tongues between adults and children. The language of tenderness and of passion. International Journal of Psycho-Analysis, 30, 225–230. 1949.Google Scholar
  7. Freud, S. (1900). The interpretation of dreams. In Standard edition (Vol. IV & V). London: The Hogart Press and the Institute of Psychoanalysis.Google Scholar
  8. Freud, S. (1905). Three essays on the theory of sexuality. In Standard edition (Vol. VII, pp. 125–245). London: The Hogart Press and the Institute of Psychoanalysis.Google Scholar
  9. Freud, S. (1914). On Narcissism. In Standard edition (Vol. XIV, pp. 67–102). London: The Hogart Press and the Institute of Psychoanalysis.Google Scholar
  10. Freud, S. (1915a). Repression. In Standard edition (Vol. XIV, pp. 146–158). London: The Hogart Press and the Institute of Psychoanalysis.Google Scholar
  11. Freud, S. (1915b). Instincts and their Vicissitudes. In Standard edition (Vol. XIV, pp. 111–140). London: The Hogart Press and the Institute of Psychoanalysis.Google Scholar
  12. Freud, S. (1920). Beyond the pleasure principle. In Standard Edition (Vol. XVIII, pp. 7–64). London: The Hogart Press and the Institute of Psychoanalysis.Google Scholar
  13. Freud, S. (1933). New introductory lectures. In Standard Edition (Vol. XXII). London: The Hogart Press and the Institute of Psychoanalysis.Google Scholar
  14. Freud, S. (1895). Project for a scientific psychology. In Standard edition (Vol. I, pp. 281–391). London: The Hogart Press and the Institute of Psychoanalysis.Google Scholar
  15. Freud, S. (1985 [1887–1904]). The complete letters of Sigmund Freud to Wilhelm Fliess, 1887–1904. Cambridge: Belknap/Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  16. Freud, S., & Breuer, J. (1895). Studies on hysteria. In Standard edition (Vol. II).Google Scholar
  17. Laplanche, J. (1999). Essays on otherness. London/New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  18. Laplanche, J. (2007). Freud and the sexual. Essays 2000–2006. New York: International Psychoanalytic Books, 2011.Google Scholar
  19. Laplanche, J., & Pontalis, J.-B. (1967). The language of psychoanalysis. London: The Hogarth Press, 1973.Google Scholar
  20. Lorenzer, A. (1972). Zur Begründung einer materialistischen Sozialisationstheorie. Frankfurt am Main, Germany: Suhrkamp.Google Scholar
  21. Lorenzer, A. (1981). Das Konzil der Buchhalter. Die Zerstörung der Sinnlichkeit. Eine Religionskritik. Frankfurt am Main, Germany: Europäische Verlagsgesellschaft.Google Scholar
  22. Lorenzer, A., & Görlich, B. (1980). Die Sozialität der Natur und die Natürlichkeit des Sozialen. Zur Interpretation der psychoanalytischen Erfahrung jenseits von Biologismus und Soziologismus. In Id & A. Schmidt (Eds.), Der Stachel Freud. Beiträge und Dokumente zur Kulturismus-Kritik (pp. 297–349). Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp, 1980.Google Scholar
  23. Masson, J. (1984). The Assault on truth. Freud’s suppression of the seduction theory. New York: Farrar Straus & Giroux.Google Scholar
  24. Miller, A. (1981). Thou shalt not be aware. Society’s betrayal of the child (p., 1984). New York: Farrar Straus Giroux.Google Scholar
  25. Mitchell, J. (1974). Psychoanalysis and feminism. Freud, Reich, Laing and women. New York: Pantheon.Google Scholar
  26. Moll, A. (1897). Untersuchungen über Libido sexualis. Berlin, Germany: Fischer’s Medizinische Buchhandlung. H. Kornfeld.Google Scholar
  27. Whitebook, J. (2001). Mutual recognition and the work of the negative. In W. Rehg & J. Bohman (Eds.), Pluralism and the pragmatic turn: The transformation of critical theory. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2011.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Sigmund Freud UniversityViennaAustria
  2. 2.Department of EducationGoethe UniversityFrankfurt a.M.Germany