Encyclopedia of Critical Psychology

2014 Edition
| Editors: Thomas Teo

Relational Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy

  • Esther Rapoport
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-5583-7_619

Introduction

Relational theories have become increasingly influential in the international psychoanalytic community in recent decades, profoundly affecting the practice of psychoanalysis and psychoanalytic psychotherapy. These theories have reenvisioned the fundamentals of psychoanalytic work, including what gets explored in the consulting room, who does the exploring, and how the patient and analyst perceive and interact with each other.

Definition

Drawing on British-school object relations theories, attachment theory, self psychology, and interpersonal psychoanalysis, relational theorists have developed an understanding of the human psyche as shaped primarily by interpersonal interactions rather than internal forces. What the many varied and heterogeneous relational approaches have in common is the view of humans, not as the solitary biological drive machines of the classical Freudian theory, but as shaped by relationships and always embedded in relational contexts, past and present...

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Online Resources

  1. IARPP: The International Association for Relational Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy. (http://www.iarpp.net/)
  2. The postdoctoral program in psychotherapy and psychoanalysis. (http://postdocpsychoanalytic.as.nyu.edu/page/home)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Private PracticeReidman CollegeTel AvivIsrael