Biographical Encyclopedia of Astronomers

2014 Edition
| Editors: Thomas Hockey, Virginia Trimble, Thomas R. Williams, Katherine Bracher, Richard A. Jarrell, Jordan D. MarchéII, JoAnn Palmeri, Daniel W. E. Green

Slocum, Frederick

  • Jordan D. MarchéII
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-9917-7_1289

BornFairhaven, Massachusetts, USA, 6 February 1873

DiedMiddletown, Connecticut, USA, 4 December 1944

American astrometrist Frederick Slocum contributed to the early twentieth-century effort to measure parallaxes for large numbers of stars. The son of Frederick and Lydia (née Jones) Slocum, Frederick earned bachelor’s (1895), master’s (1896), and doctoral (1898) degrees from Brown University. Slocum married Carrie E. Tripp in 1899; the couple had no children.

Slocum was appointed assistant professor of astronomy at Brown University (1900–1909). He received additional training in astrophysics at Potsdam Observatory and returned to teach that subject at Yerkes Observatory (1909–1914). In 1914, Slocum was appointed professor of astronomy and director of Wesleyan University’s Van Vleck Observatory, and apart from 2 years spent as a visiting instructor in nautical science at Brown University (1918–1920), remained in those positions until his retirement.

Slocum participated in efforts...

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Selected References

  1. Anon. (1950). “Slocum, Frederick.” In Who Was Who in America. Vol. 2, p. 492. Chicago: A. N. Marquis.Google Scholar
  2. Slocum, Frederick (1898). “The Harmonic Analysis of the Tides and a Discussion of the Tides of Narragansett Bay.” Ph.D. diss., Brown University.Google Scholar
  3. Slocum, Frederick, C. L. Stearns, and B. W. Sitterly (1938). Stellar Parallaxes Derived from Photographs Made with the 20-inch Refractor of the Van Vleck Observatory. Middletown, Connecticut: Edwards Brothers.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jordan D. MarchéII
    • 1
  1. 1.University of WisconsinMadisonUSA