Biographical Encyclopedia of Astronomers

2014 Edition
| Editors: Thomas Hockey, Virginia Trimble, Thomas R. Williams, Katherine Bracher, Richard A. Jarrell, Jordan D. MarchéII, JoAnn Palmeri, Daniel W. E. Green

See, Thomas Jefferson Jackson

  • Ronald A. Schorn
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-9917-7_1254

Bornnear Montgomery City, Missouri, USA, 19 February 1866

DiedOakland, California, USA, 4 July 1962

American astronomer T. J. J. See is remembered, if at all, for erroneous, perhaps even fraudulent, claims for the detection of planets orbiting other stars, though others of his once wild-sounding ideas sound superficially like our modern understanding of, for instance, solar-system formation. See earned his undergraduate degree from the University of Missouri at Columbia in 1889 and his doctorate from the University of Berlin in 1892 with a thesis on the orbits and origins of visual binary stars. Upon returning to the United States, he spent 3 years at the University of Chicago. While there, he ran afoul of  George Hale, the driving force behind the establishment of the Yerkes Observatory (and later those at Mount Wilson and Palomar), a circumstance that did little to advance See’s career. See spent the next 2 years in the employ of  Percival Lowell, during which time the former...

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Selected References

  1. Ashbrook, Joseph (1962). “The Sage of Mare Island.” Sky & Telescope 24, no. 4: 193, 202.Google Scholar
  2. Moulton, F. R. (1899). “The Limits of Temporary Stability of Satellite Motion, with an Application to the Question of the Existence of an Unseen Body in the Binary System F. 70 Ophiuchi.” Astronomical Journal 20: 33–37.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. — (1912). “Capture Theory and Capture Practice.” Popular Astronomy 20: 67–82, esp. 76–82.Google Scholar
  4. See, T. J. J. (1896–1910). Researches on the Evolution of the Stellar Systems. 2 Vols. Lynn, Massachusetts: Nichols Press.Google Scholar
  5. Webb, William Larkin (1913). Brief Biography and Popular Account of the Unparalleled Discoveries of T. J. J. See. Lynn, Massachusetts: T.P. Nichols and Son.MATHGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ronald A. Schorn
    • 1
  1. 1.Texas A & M University, College StationTXUSA