Encyclopedia of Behavioral Medicine

2013 Edition
| Editors: Marc D. Gellman, J. Rick Turner

Pain Management/Control

  • Michael James Coons
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-1005-9_1157

Synonyms

Definition

Pain is a multidimensional phenomenon. Pain management refers to the physiological (i.e., pharmacological, surgical), psychological, and behavioral interventions that are aimed at minimizing pain perception and alleviating pain-related interference and disability.

Description

Historically, pain was conceptualized using a disease model and was considered to be a purely sensory experience resulting from injury, inflammation, or tissue damage. However, limitations to this model became evident after observing diverse responses to pain across individuals despite objectively similar physical stimuli or trauma. In 1965, Melzack and Wall published a seminal paper in Science that outlined a revolutionary theory of pain (Melzack & Wall, 1965).

Gate Control Theory

The Gate Control Theory emphasized central neural mechanisms at the level of the spinal cord that modulate afferent signals from peripheral nerves en route to the brain. This sensory...

This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access.

References and Readings

  1. Asmundson, G. J. G., Norton, P. J., & Norton, G. R. (1999). Beyond pain: The role of fear and avoidance in chronicity. Clinical Psychology Review, 19, 97–119.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Asmundson, G. J. G., Norton, P. J., & Vlaeyen, J. W. S. (2004). Fear-avoidance models of chronic pain: An overview. In G. J. G. Asmundson, J. W. S. Vlaeyen, & G. Crobez (Eds.), Understanding and treating fear of pain (pp. 3–24). New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  3. Bajwa, Z. H., & Ho, C. (2004). Antiepileptics for pain. In C. A. Warfield & Z. H. Bajwa (Eds.), Principles and practice of pain medicine (2nd ed., pp. 649–654). New York: McGraw Hill.Google Scholar
  4. Day, M., & Anderson, S. (2004). Cryoanalgesia and radiofrequency. In C. A. Warfield & Z. H. Bajwa (Eds.), Principles and practice of pain medicine (2nd ed., pp. 751–764). New York: McGraw Hill.Google Scholar
  5. DeSio, J. M. (2004). Epidural steroid injections. In C. A. Warfield & Z. H. Bajwa (Eds.), Principles and practice of pain medicine (2nd ed., pp. 655–661). New York: McGraw Hill.Google Scholar
  6. Du Pen, S. L., & Du Pen, A. (2004). Neuraxial drug delivery. In C. A. Warfield & Z. H. Bajwa (Eds.), Principles and practice of pain medicine (2nd ed., pp. 720–739). New York: McGraw Hill.Google Scholar
  7. Keefe, F. J., Beaupre, P. M., & Gil, K. M. (2002). Group therapy for patients with chronic pain. In R. J. Gatchel & D. C. Turk (Eds.), Psychological approaches to pain management: A practitioner’s handbook (pp. 234–255). New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  8. Lamer, L. J. (2004). Intra-articular injections and facet blocks. In C. A. Warfield & Z. H. Bajwa (Eds.), Principles and practice of pain medicine (2nd ed., pp. 667–683). New York: McGraw Hill.Google Scholar
  9. Lehmann, L. J. (2004). Peripheral nerve blocks. In C. A. Warfield & Z. H. Bajwa (Eds.), Principles and practice of pain medicine (2nd ed., pp. 684–695). New York: McGraw Hill.Google Scholar
  10. Lipman, A. G., & Jackson, K. C. (2004). Opioid pharmacotherapy. In C. A. Warfield & Z. H. Bajwa (Eds.), Principles and practice of pain medicine (2nd ed., pp. 583–600). New York: McGraw Hill.Google Scholar
  11. Melzack, R. (1999). From the gate to the neuromatrix. Pain (Suppl. 6), 82, S121-S126.Google Scholar
  12. Melzack, R., & Wall, P. D. (1965). Pain mechanisms: A new theory. Science, 150, 971–979.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Simon, L. S. (2004). Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. In C. A. Warfield & Z. H. Bajwa (Eds.), Principles and practice of pain medicine (2nd ed., pp. 616–626). New York: McGraw Hill.Google Scholar
  14. Turk, D. C. (2002). A cognitive-behavioral perspective on treatment of chronic pain patients. In R. J. Gatchel & D. C. Turk (Eds.), Psychological approaches to pain management: A practitioner’s handbook (pp. 138–158). New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  15. Turk, D. C., Meichenbaum, D., & Genest, M. (1983). Pain and behavioral medicine: A cognitive-behavioral perspective. New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  16. Vlaeyen, J. W. S., de Jong, J., Sieben, J., & Crombez, G. (2002). Graded exposure in vivo for pain-related fear. In R. J. Gatchel & D. C. Turk (Eds.), Psychological approaches to pain management: A practitioner’s handbook (pp. 210–233). New York: Guilford.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Preventive MedicineFeinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern UniversityChicagoUSA