Encyclopedia of Sustainability Science and Technology

2012 Edition
| Editors: Robert A. Meyers

Urban Atmospheric Composition Processes

Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-0851-3_493

Definition of the Subject

The majority of the population now live in cities (the 50% point was passed during 2007 [1]) and are exposed to the urban atmosphere every day of their lives. As global population has also doubled over the past 50 years, urban air quality is a major factor in pollutant exposure for billions of individuals. The urban atmospheric environment is unique, with the city landscape defining particular meteorological characteristics, and a wide range and high density of emission (or pollution) sources, which combine to determine local air quality. Air pollutants , ranging from gases such as carbon monoxide, ozone and nitrogen dioxide, to suspended particles of varying size and composition, have been shown to be linked to respiratory and cardiovascular health issues. Urban atmospheric composition processes affect the abundance of primary pollutants, and are wholly responsible for the formation of secondary species such as ozone. In this article, the principle...

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Geography, Earth & Environmental SciencesUniversity of BirminghamBirminghamUK