Encyclopedia of Sustainability Science and Technology

2012 Edition
| Editors: Robert A. Meyers

Global Economic Impact of Transgenic/Biotech Crops (1996–2008)

Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-0851-3_166

Definition of the Subject

The application of biotechnology to commercial agriculture on a widespread basis has occurred since 1996. The extent of this adoption in terms of crops and (biotechnology) traits is explored and the associated economic impacts for the period 1996–2008 are assessed, to help identify some of the main reasons why farmers have adopted the technology.

Introduction

This article examines specific global socioeconomic impacts on farm income over the 13-year period 1996–2008. It also quantifies the production impact of the technology on the key crops in areas where it has been used. The analysis concentrates on farm income effects because this is a primary driver of adoption among farmers (both large commercial and small-scale subsistence). It also considers more indirect farm income or nonpecuniary benefits, and quantifies the (net) production impact of the technology. More specifically, it covers the following main issues:
  • Impact on crop yields

  • Effect on key costs of...

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Agricultural Economist, PG Economics LtdDorsetUK