Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology

2014 Edition
| Editors: Claire Smith

Kent, Susan

Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-0465-2_990

Basic Biographical Information

Thoroughly engaged in anthropology, ethnoarchaeology, and social activism, Susan Kent (1952–2003) was born on 26 June 1952 in Oakland, California, and passed away on 12 April 2003 while attending the annual Society for American Archaeology meeting in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Educated at the University of Southern Colorado, Pueblo, Colorado (B.S. in Anthropology, 1973), and Washington State University (M.A., 1975; Ph.D., 1980, both in Anthropology), she held visiting faculty appointments at the Universities of New Mexico, Iowa State, and Kentucky before joining the faculty at Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia, in 1986. In 2000, Old Dominion honored Kent as Eminent Professor of Anthropology.

Major Accomplishments

From the outset of her career, Kent challenged herself, as well as her colleagues, to think across disciplinary boundaries and theoretical perspectives and to value the insights such intersections could produce. Indeed, she sought to...

This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access.

References

  1. Ashmore, W., M.-A. Dobres, S.M. Nelson & A. Rosen. (ed.) 2006. Integrating the diversity of twenty-first-century anthropology: the life and intellectual legacies of Susan Kent (Archaeological Papers of the American Anthropological Association 16). Arlington (VA): American Anthropological Association.Google Scholar
  2. Kent, S. 1984.Analyzing activity areas: an ethnoarchaeological study of the use of space. Albuquerque (NM): University of New Mexico Press.Google Scholar
  3. Kent, S. (ed.) 1987. Method and theory for activity area research: an ethnoarchaeological approach. New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
  4. - 1989. Farmers as hunters: the implications of sedentism. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  5. - 1990. Domestic architecture and the use of space: an interdisciplinary cross-cultural study. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  6. - 1996. Cultural diversity among twentieth-century foragers: an African perspective. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  7. - 1998. Gender in African archaeology. Walnut Creek (CA): AltaMira Press.Google Scholar
  8. - 2002. Ethnicity, hunter-gatherers, and the “other”: association or assimilation in Africa. Washington (DC): Smithsonian Institution Press.Google Scholar
  9. Stuart-Macadam, P. & S. Kent. (ed.) 1992. Diet, demography, and disease: changing perspectives on anemia. New York: Aldine de Gruyter.Google Scholar

Further Reading

  1. Kent, S. 1986. The influence of sedentism and aggregation on porotic hyperostosis and anemia: a case study. Man 21: 605-36.Google Scholar
  2. - 1989. And justice for all: the development of political centralization among newly sedentary foragers. American Anthropologist 91: 703-12.Google Scholar
  3. - 1990. Kalahari violence in perspective. American Anthropologist 92: 1015-7.Google Scholar
  4. - 1991. Partitioning space: cross-cultural factors influencing domestic spatial segmentation. Environment and Behavior 23: 438-73.Google Scholar
  5. - 1992. The current forager controversy: real versus ideal views of hunter-gatherers. Man 27: 45-70.Google Scholar
  6. - 1995. Does sedentarization promote gender inequality? A case study from the Kalahari. Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute 1: 513-36.Google Scholar
  7. - 1999. The archaeological visibility of storage: delineating storage from trash areas. American Antiquity 64: 79-94.Google Scholar
  8. - 1999. Egalitarianism, equality, and equitable power, in T.L. Sweely (ed.) Manifesting power: gender and the interpretation of power in archaeology: 30-48. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  9. Kent, S. & D. Dunn. 1993. Etiology of hypoferremia in a recently sedentary Kalahari village. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 48: 554-67.Google Scholar
  10. Kent, S. & R.B. Lee. 1992. A hematological study of Kung Kalahari foragers: an eighteen year comparison, in P. Stuart-Macadam & S. Kent (ed.) Diet, demography, and disease: changing views of anemia: 173-99. New York: Aldine de Gruyter.Google Scholar
  11. Rosen, A., S.M. Nelson, M.-A. Dobres & W. Ashmore. 2006. Introduction. Susan Kent: a life and a legacy, in W. Ashmore, M.-A. Dobres, S.M. Nelson & A. Rosen (ed.) Integrating the diversity of twenty-first-century anthropology: the life and intellectual legacies of Susan Kent (Archaeological Papers of the American Anthropological Association 16): 1-9. Arlington (VA): American Anthropological Association. (contains a complete bibliography of Susan Kent’s writings).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of CaliforniaRiversideUSA