Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology

2014 Edition
| Editors: Claire Smith

Khok Phanom Di, Archaeology of

Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-0465-2_983

Introduction

Khok Phanom Di is a deeply stratified prehistoric mound located on the eastern margin of the Bangkok Plain in Thailand. Excavations in 1984–1985 in an area of 100 m 2 revealed a stratigraphic sequence 7 m-deep. The cultural buildup incorporated shell middens, occupation and industrial remains, and human inhumation graves. The radiocarbon determinations indicated that the site was occupied between approximately 2000 and 1500 cal. BCE (Fig. 1).
This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access

References

  1. Bellwood, P. & M. Oxenham. 2008. The expansions of farming societies and the role of the Neolithic demographic transition, in J.-P. Bocquet-Appel & O. Bar-Yosef (ed.) The Neolithic demographic transition and its consequences: 13-34. New York; Berlin: Springer.Google Scholar
  2. Bentley, A., N. Tayles, C.F.W. Higham, C. MacPherson & T.C. Atkinson. 2007. Shifting gender relations at Khok Phanom Di, Thailand: isotopic evidence from the skeletons. Current Anthropology 48: 301-14.Google Scholar
  3. Higham, C.F.W., T.F.G. Higham, K. Douka, R. Ciarla, A. Kijngam & F. Rispoli. 2011. The origins of the Bronze Age of Southeast Asia. Journal of World Prehistory 24: 227-74.Google Scholar
  4. Higham, C.F.W. & R. Thosarat. (ed.) 2004. The excavation of Khok Phanom Di, Volume VII: summary and conclusions (Report of the Research Committee of the Society of Antiquaries of London 72) London: The Society of Antiquaries of London.Google Scholar
  5. Mason, G.M. 1996. The micromolluscs, in C.F.W. Higham & R. Thosarat (ed.) The excavation of Khok Phanom Di, a prehistoric site in Central Thailand,Volume IV: subsistence and environment: the botanical evidence.The biological remains (Part II) (Report of the Research Committee of the Society of Antiquaries of London LIII): 239-64. London: Society of Antiquaries of London.Google Scholar
  6. McKenzie, K.G. 1991. The ostracodes and forams, in C.F.W. Higham & R. Bannanurag (ed.) The excavation of Khok Phanom Di, Volume 2 (Part 1): the biological remains (Research Report of the Society of Antiquaries of London XLVIII): 139-46. London: Society of Antiquaries of London.Google Scholar
  7. Rispoli, F. 2008. The incised and impressed pottery style of mainland Southeast Asia: following the paths of Neolithization. East & West 57: 235-304.Google Scholar
  8. Tayles, NG. 1999. The people (Research Report of the Society of Antiquaries of London LXI). London: Society of Antiquaries of London.Google Scholar
  9. Thompson, G.B. 1996. The excavation of Khok Phanom Di. A prehistoric site in central Thailand,Volume IV (Part II) (Report of the Research Committee of the Society of Antiquaries of London LIII): subsistence and environment: the botanical evidence. London: Society of Antiquaries of London.Google Scholar
  10. Zhang, C. & H.C. Hung. 2010. The emergence of agriculture in southern China. Antiquity 84: 11-25.Google Scholar

Further Reading

  1. Higham, C.F.W. & R. Thosarat. (ed.) 1998. The excavation of Nong Norn a prehistoric site in Central Thailand (Otago University Studies in Prehistoric Anthropology 18). Otago: University of Otago, Department of Anthropology.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Anthropology and ArchaeologyUniversity of OtagoDunedinNew Zealand