Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology

2014 Edition
| Editors: Claire Smith

Early Regional Centers: Evolution and Organization

Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-0465-2_963

Introduction

The shift from autonomous, egalitarian societies to complex societies having significant social inequalities is an historical phenomenon that occurred across the globe. To understand in part how this occurred, archaeologists have focused their research upon the evolution and organization of early regional centers (Fig.  1). Much has been learned about the development of these ancient settlements, and recent studies utilizing more detailed data are providing rich understandings of the role of early regional centers in human history.
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References

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Further Reading

  1. Anderson, D.G. 1994. The Savannah River chiefdoms: political change in the late prehistoric Southeast. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.Google Scholar
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  4. Blitz, J.H. 1999. Mississippian chiefdoms and the fission-fusion process. American Antiquity 64: 577-92.Google Scholar
  5. Blitz, J.H. & K.G. Lorenz. 2006. The Chattahoochee chiefdoms. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.Google Scholar
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  7. Flannery, K.V. & J. Marcus. 2003. The origin of war: new 14c dates from ancient Mexico. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 100:11801-11805.Google Scholar
  8. Hally, D.J. 1996. Platform-mound construction and the instability of Mississippian chiefdoms, in J.F. Scarry (ed.) Political structure and change in the prehistoric southeastern United States: 92-127. Gainesville: University Press of Florida.Google Scholar
  9. Neitzel, J. 1999. (ed.) Great towns and ancient polities in the prehistoric American Southwest and Southeast. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press.Google Scholar
  10. Pauketat, T.R. 1994. The ascent of chiefs: Cahokia and Mississippian politics in Native North America. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.Google Scholar
  11. Powis, T.G., W.J. Hurst, M. del Carmen Rodriguez, M. Blake, D. Cheetham, M.D. Coe & J.G. Hodson. 2008. The origins of cacao use in Mesoamerica. Mexican 30: 35-38.Google Scholar
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  13. Wilson, G.D. 2008.T he archaeology of everyday life at early Moundville. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press.Google Scholar
  14. Yoffee, N. 1993. Too many chiefs? (or safe texts for the ‘90s), in N. Yoffee & A. Sherratt (ed.) Archaeological theory: who sets the agenda?: 60-78. Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Museum of AnthropologyUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA