Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology

2014 Edition
| Editors: Claire Smith

East Asia: Paleolithic

  • Chen Shen
  • Xing Gao
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-0465-2_659

Introduction

East Asia conventionally refers to the countries of China, Japan, and Korea; but in a broad geo-cultural sense, the region includes all types of landscapes in today’s Mainland China, Mongolia, islands of Taiwan, Japanese Archipelago, Korean Peninsula and its associate islands, as well as the Russian Far East in the north end and the northern part of Indochina Peninsula in the south end.

Our current understanding of the Paleolithic in East Asia has been based on isolated fossils and lithic data separately from China, Japan, and Korea. Until recently primary interpretations of Paleolithic technology and hominid behaviors have been built upon Chinese data with some from Japanese materials. Only during the last decade have collaborative efforts been made to consolidate the data from the three countries plus Russia via the annual meetings of the Asian Palaeolithic Association (APA) and their proceedings; however, only few thematic syntheses in East Asia have been available in...

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of World CulturesRoyal Ontario MuseumTorontoCanada
  2. 2.Department of PalaeoanthropologyInstitute of Vertebrate Palaeontology and Palaenanthropology, Chinese Academy of SciencesBeijingChina