Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology

2014 Edition
| Editors: Claire Smith

Aerial and Satellite Remote Sensing in Archaeology

  • Douglas C. ComerEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-0465-2_520

Introduction

Aerial and satellite remote sensing technologies offer a noninvasive and nondestructive tool that can be used in many ways for the preservation and conservation of archaeological sites and landscapes. A synoptic, landscape perspective is inherent in the use of these technologies, which enriches the context that is essential to understanding the value of archaeological discoveries. The extent and nature of environmental changes that threaten sites can often be more quickly observed, characterized, and measured by observing the landscape from above, rather than exploring it on the ground. With training, archaeologists can use them to (1) directly detect archaeological sites, (2) model likely site locations, (3) assess the importance of sites based upon spatial relationships among sites themselves as well as relationships among sites and environmental features, (4) detect threats to sites and landscapes arising from natural processes or from development, and (5) monitor such...

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References

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Further Reading

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.ICOMOS International Scientific Committee on Archaeological Heritage Management (ICAHM)Cultural Site Research and Management, Inc. (CSRM)BaltimoreUSA