Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology

2014 Edition
| Editors: Claire Smith

Ethics in Archaeology

Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-0465-2_283

Introduction

Regardless of location, specialty, rank, heritage, gender, or age, ethics is an important part of the practice of every archaeologist. Archaeologists learn about, apply, and debate ethics in formal and informal contexts: college classrooms, staff meetings, publications, field-research sites, and at the bar (or metaphorical watercooler) during professional meetings. Long ago, the discipline of archaeology abandoned the idea that archaeologists practice in isolation a value-free science, free from interactions with modern peoples. Ethnic conflict, colonialism (and post-colonialism), globalization, structural inequalities, illicit markets, development, nationalism, imperialism, and terrorism – these realities of the world are all directly or indirectly connected to the global practice of archaeology.

Archaeology is the systematic study of past cultures and peoples based on analysis of recovered material evidence. Archaeologists reveal, interpret, and preserve parts of our...

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References

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Further Reading

  1. Brodie, N.M., M. Kersel, C. Luke & K.W. Tubb. (ed.) 2006. Archaeology, cultural heritage, and the antiquities trade. Gainesville: University Press of Florida.Google Scholar
  2. Colwell-Chanthaphonh, C. & T.J. Ferguson. (ed.) 2007. Collaboration in archaeological practice: engaging descendant communities. Lanham: AltaMira Press.Google Scholar
  3. Dongoske, K., M. Aldenderfer & K. Doehner. (ed.) 2000. Working together: Native Americans and archaeologists. Washington (DC): Society for American Archaeology Press.Google Scholar
  4. Fluehr-Lobban, C. (ed.) 2003. Ethics and the profession of anthropology: dialogue for ethically conscious practice. Walnut Creek: AltaMira Press.Google Scholar
  5. Little, B. (ed.) 2002. Public benefits of archaeology. Gainesville: University Press of Florida.Google Scholar
  6. Meskell, L. & P. Pels. (ed.) 2005. Embedding ethics: shifting boundaries of the anthropological profession. Oxford: Berg.Google Scholar
  7. Silliman, S. (ed.) 2008. Collaborating at the trowels edge: teaching and learning in indigenous archaeology. Tucson: University of Arizona Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyIndiana UniversityBloomingtonUSA