Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology

2014 Edition
| Editors: Claire Smith

Kanaseki, Hiroshi

Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-0465-2_2459

Basic Biographical Information

Hiroshi Kanaseki is a Japanese archaeologist and an Emeritus Professor of Tenri University (Fig. 1). He was born in Kyoto in 1927 as the second son of the famous anthropologist, Takeo Kanaseki. Takeo learned archaeological methodology at Kyoto University from Kosaku Hamada, who is regarded as the father of archaeology in Japan, while he worked as an Assistant Professor of the Department of Anatomy of the university. Takeo Kanaseki submitted a doctoral thesis on the anthropological study of Ryukyu people in East Asia, three years after Hiroshi was born, and then moved to Taipei to become a Professor of the former National Taiwan University. Hiroshi Kanaseki joined his father on the island in 1936. During his teenage years in Taiwan, Hiroshi often accompanied his father to help at archaeological excavations.
This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access

Further Reading

  1. Kanaseki, H. 1982. Kami wo maneku tori. [Bird serving as a guide for the God.], in Publication Committee for Doctor Yukio Kobayashi’s Seventieth Birthday Memorial Essays (ed.) Koko-gaku ronko. [A collection of papers on archaeology.]: 281-303. Tokyo: Heibon-sha (in Japanese).Google Scholar
  2. - 1985. Sekai no kokogaku to nihon no kokogaku [Archaeologies in the world and archaeology in Japan.], in Y. Kondo et al. (ed.) Iwanami koza: nihon kokogaku. [The Iwanami’s academic courses: Japanese archaeology.] Volume 1: 301-43. Tokyo: Iwanami-Shoten (in Japanese).Google Scholar
  3. - 1986. Jujutsu to matsuri [Magic and ritual.], in Y. Kondo et al. (ed.) Iwanami koza: nihon kokogaku. [The Iwanami’s academic courses: Japanese archaeology.] Volume 4: 269-306. Tokyo: Iwanami-Shoten (in Japanese).Google Scholar
  4. - 1988. Seishin seikatsu [Spiritual life.], in H. Otsuka, M. Tozawa & M. Sahara (ed.) Nihon kokogaku wo manabu: Shinpan. [Studying the Japanese archaeology: new edition.] Volume 2: 292-309. Tokyo: Yuhikaku (in Japanese).Google Scholar
  5. - 1993. Kosho-bo shutsudo no gazo-mon ni tsuite. [On the pictorial motif on the grave goods found in Gao Zhuang Tomb.], in Publication Committee for Mr Kiyotari Tsuboi’s Seventieth Birthday Memorial Essays (ed.) Ron’en koko-gaku. [A collection of papers on archaeology.]: 737-49. Tokyo: Tenzan-sha (in Japanese).Google Scholar
  6. - 1997. Saishu kogi roku: ibutsu no kokogaku, iseki no kokogaku. [Final lecture: archaeology of objects and archaeology of sites.] Koji [Ancient matters] 1: 54-65 (in Japanese).Google Scholar
  7. - 2004. Yayoi no Shuzoku to Shukyo. [Mores and religion of Yayoi period.] Tokyo: Gakusei-sha (in Japanese).Google Scholar
  8. Kokubu, N., et al. 1968. Kanaseki Takeo hakushi nenpu [A chronological record of Dr. Takeo Kanaseki’s career.], in Publication Committee for Professor Takeo Kanaseki’s Seventieth Birthday Memorial Essays (ed.) Nihon minzoku to nanpou bunka. [The Japanese race and south cultures.]: 959-65. Tokyo: Heibon-sha (in Japanese).Google Scholar
  9. Publication Committee for Professor Takeo Kanaseki’s Seventieth Birthday Memorial Essays. 1997. Kanko ni atatte [Foreword.], in Publication Committee for Professor Takeo Kanaseki’s Seventieth Birthday Memorial Essays (ed.) Shukyo to kokogaku. [Religion and archaeology.]: 1-3 Tokyo: Bensei-sha (in Japanese).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Centre for Cultural Heritage of Kyoto UniversityKyotoJapan