Encyclopedia of Medieval Philosophy

2011 Edition
| Editors: Henrik Lagerlund

Paul of Pergula

  • Stephen F. Brown
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-9729-4_373

Abstract

Paul of Pergula was the first to hold a chair of Philosophy at Venice. We do not know much about his life, since the chief sources of information concerning him simply indicate that he flourished from 1400 to 1454, that he studied under Paul of Venice, refused the offer to be ordained a bishop in 1448 and chose rather to administer the Church of St. John the Almoner in Venice. His most printed work, Logica, was published by his student and successor, Domenico Bragadino. Another of his works, Dubia super consequentiis Strodi, a commentary on Ralph Strode’s Consequences, was by a statute of 1496 a required text at the University of Padua. His Logica went through eight editions between 1481 and 1501 and survives in ten manuscripts, including four at the Bodleian Library in Oxford.

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Bibliography

Primary Sources

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen F. Brown
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Medieval Philosophy and TheologyBoston CollegeChestnut HillUSA