Encyclopedia of Global Justice

2011 Edition
| Editors: Deen K. Chatterjee

Marx, Karl

  • David A. Duquette
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-9160-5_694

Without doubt, the writings of Karl Marx have had great impact in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, not only because of Marx’s powerful radical critiques of society, the state, and political economy but also because of his philosophy of revolutionary praxis and his influence on the development of labor movements internationally. His theory of capitalism and of the revolutionary transformation of capitalist society is truly a global conception. While it is evident that with the failure of communism, or at least of the major state socialist regimes that called themselves “communist,” Marxism is no longer fashionable and the study of Marx and the relevance of his ideas for contemporary society has languished, nevertheless, exploitation, social disruption, and economic crises in an increasingly globalized capitalistic world continue to be problems for humanity. Marx’s thought remains relevant, if not in its complete form with regard to theoretical assumptions, for example, about the...

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • David A. Duquette
    • 1
  1. 1.St. Norbert CollegeDe PereUSA