Encyclopedia of Entomology

2008 Edition
| Editors: John L. Capinera

Veterinary Pests and their Management

  • Jerome A. Hogsette
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-6359-6_3974
Pests of veterinary importance are unique in their associations with animals hosts. Unlike the many pests that utilize plants or plant materials for their survival, pests of veterinary importance feed on hosts that can for the most part move from place to place. Thus, the hosts can live in a variety of habitats, move from one habitat to another during a daily cycle, and persist through a variety of climatic conditions during an annual cycle. The host range can be relatively small and associated with a central nest or burrow, or it can be practically endless in the case of herds of range cattle or migratory antelope. Likewise, the range of the pest can be limited geographically to certain locations, climates, or altitudes. Conversely, the pest can be cosmopolitan and affect similar hosts on almost every continent of the planet. Specifically, highly specialized pests can be limited to one or two host species, such as the sheep ked, Melophagus ovinus, a widely distributed parasite of...
This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access

References

  1. Farkas R, Hogsette JA (2000) Control possibilities of filth-breeding flies in livestock and poultry production. In: Papp L, Darvas B (eds) Manual of palearctic Diptera, vol 1: General and applied dipterology. Science Herald, Budapest, Hungary, pp 889–904Google Scholar
  2. Greenberg B (1971) Flies and disease, vol 1. Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJGoogle Scholar
  3. Greenberg, B (1973) Flies and disease, vol 2. Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJGoogle Scholar
  4. Harwood RF, James MT (1979) Entomology in human and animal health, 7th edn. Macmillan Publishing Co., Inc., New York, NYGoogle Scholar
  5. Hogsette JA, Farkas R (2000) Secretophagous and haematophagous higher Diptera. In: Papp L, Darvas B (eds) Manual of palearctic Diptera, vol 1: General and applied dipterology. Science Herald, Budapest, Hungary, pp 769–792Google Scholar
  6. Kettle DS (1995) Medical and veterinary entomology, 2nd edn. CAB International, Wallingford, UKGoogle Scholar
  7. Wall R, Shearer D (1997) Veterinary entomology. Chapman and Hall, London, UKGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jerome A. Hogsette
    • 1
  1. 1.U.S. Department of Agriculture, ARSGainesvilleUSA