Encyclopedia of Entomology

2008 Edition
| Editors: John L. Capinera

Mahogany Pests and Their Management

  • F. W. Howard
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-6359-6_1683

Mahoganies are the source of an exceptionally valuable cabinet wood, and are widely considered the most economically important tropical timber trees in the world. Thus, the insects that attack mahoganies are of considerable economic importance. True mahoganies include three species of Swietenia (family Meliaceae) that are native to the American Tropics. These are West Indies mahogany (S. mahagoni Jacquin), Honduras, or big-leaf, mahogany (S. macrophylla King), and Pacific mahogany (S. humilis Zuccarini).

West Indies mahogany is native to the Greater Antilles except Puerto Rico, with its native range extending north of the tropics proper to southern Florida and some islands of the Bahamas. Exploitation of West Indies mahogany began early in the European colonial period, especially in Cuba, Hispaniola, and Jamaica, and by the twentieth century the species was greatly depleted from natural areas by excessive logging. It remains a popular shade tree in urban areas of southern Florida, the...

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References

  1. Floyd RB, Hauxwell C (2001) Hypsipyla shoot borers in Meliaceae. In: Floyd RB, Hauxwell C (eds) International Workshop on Hypsipyla Shoot Borers in Meliaceae, ACIAR Proceedings No. 97, 20–23 August 1996Google Scholar
  2. Howard FW, Nakahara S, Williams DS (1995) Thysanoptera as apparent pollinators of West Indies mahogany, Swietenia mahagoni (Meliaceae). Ann Sci Forest 52:283–286CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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  4. Lamb FB (1966) Mahogany of tropical America. Its ecology and management. University of Michigan Press, Ann Arbor, MichiganGoogle Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. W. Howard
    • 1
  1. 1.University of FloridaFort LauderdaleUSA