Encyclopedia of Entomology

2008 Edition
| Editors: John L. Capinera

Genetic Sexing

  • Gerald Franz
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-6359-6_1061

Genetic sexing refers to the methodologies enabling the separation of large numbers of insects according to sex (e.g., the separation or killing of females so that an all male population is produced). It is especially relevant for the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) which is used to control or eradicate key insect pests by introducing genetic sterility into the target population. The primary active agent in the SIT is the sterile male, although in practice, both sexes have been released. A role for the sterile female in the SIT was sometimes debated, but direct evidence shows that females do not contribute significantly to the sterility induced in the wild population. In fact, releasing both sexes together at the high overflooding ratios required for the SIT to be effective leads to assortative mating among the released flies and, consequently, dilutes their effectiveness.

Genetic sexing can be achieved by utilizing natural differences between males and females (e.g., the time of...

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References

  1. Fisher K, Caceres C (2000) A filter rearing system for mass reared medfly. In: Tan KH (ed) Area-wide control of fruit flies and other insect pests. Joint Proceedings of the 1998 International Conference on Area-wide Control of Insect Pests and of the Fifth International Symposium on Fruit Flies of Economic Importance. Penang, Malaysia, pp 543–550Google Scholar
  2. Franz G, Gencheva E, Kerremans Ph (1994) Improved stability of sex-separation strains for the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata. Genome 37:72–82PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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  5. Rendon P, McInnis DO, Lance DL, Stewart J (2000) Comparison of medfly male-only and bisexual releases in large scale field trials. In: Tan KH (ed)Area-wide control of fruit flies and other insect pests. Joint Proceedings of the 1998 International Conference on Area-wide Control of Insect Pests and of the Fifth International Symposium on Fruit Flies of Economic Importance. Penang, Malaysia, pp 517–525Google Scholar
  6. Robinson AS, Franz G, Fisher K (1999) Genetic sexing strains in the medfly, Ceratitis capitata: development, mass rearing and field application. Trends Entomol 2:81–104Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gerald Franz
    • 1
  1. 1.International Atomic Energy AgencySeibersdorfAustria