Ethnobotany in the Pacific

  • Yadhu N. Singh
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4020-4425-0_8582
The island communities of the Pacific, sometimes collectively known as Oceania, are inhabited by indigenous peoples from three major cultural or ethnic regions: Polynesia, Melanesia, and Micronesia (Fig. 1).
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References

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© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg New York 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yadhu N. Singh

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