Mineralogy

1981 Edition

Biopyribole

  • Keith Frye
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/0-387-30720-6_17

The mineral terms “biopyribole” and “pyribole” were coined by A. Johannsen from parts of the names (bio)tite, (pyr)oxene, and amphi(bole) as labels to be used in the field when more precise identification was not immediately possible. These terms were revived by J. B. Thompson, Jr., for crystallochemical reasons to illustrate the kinship among micas, pyroxenes, and amphiboles.

By dividing the structures of these mineral groups into modules (see Polysomatism), the amphibole structure and composition may be conceived as a mineralogical hybred composed of alternating modules of pyroxene and mica structures and compositions in the ratio 1:1 (see Table 1).
TABLE 1.

Polysomatic Series in the Biopyriboles

mica

 

pyroxene

 

amphibole

talc

+

diopside

=

tremolite

Mg3 Si4 O10 (OH)2

 

Ca2 Mg2 Si4 O12

 

Ca2 Mg5 Si8 O22 (OH)2

talc

+

enstatite

=

anthophyllite

Mg3 Si4 O10 (OH)2

 

Mg4 Si4 O12

 

Mg7 Si8 O22 (OH)2

talc

+

jadeite

=

glaucophane

Mg3 Si4 O10 (OH)2

 

Na2 Al2Si4 O12

 

Na2 Mg3 Al2 Si8 O22 (OH)2

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References

  1. Thompson, J. B., Jr., 1978. Biopyriboles and polysomatic series, Am. Mineralogist, 63, 239–249.Google Scholar
  2. Veblen, D. R.; Buseck, P. R.; and Burnham, W. C., 1977. Asbestiform chain silicates: New minerals and structure groups, Science, 198, 359–365.Google Scholar

Cross-references

  1.  Amphibole Group;  Phyllosilicates;  Pyroxene Group. Vol. IVA: Mineral Classes: Silicates.

Copyright information

© Hutchinson Ross Publishing Company 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Keith Frye

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