Encyclopedia of Educational Philosophy and Theory

Living Edition
| Editors: Michael A. Peters

Peirce and Education, an Overview

  • Torill Strand
  • Catherine W. LeggEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-287-532-7_571-1

Synonyms

Introduction

The philosophy of Charles S. Peirce (1839–1914) enhances our understanding of educational processes. Peirce was the founder of American pragmatism, which today is a many-faceted branch of philosophy characterized by a critique of abstractions, traditional dichotomies such as mind and body, and metaphysical absolutes. At the turn of the last century, William James’ lectures on pragmatism (1907) won an enthusiastic response, and “pragmatism” soon became a popular stance among American policy-makers and experts who celebrated its practical and result-oriented aspects. However, as a philosophical position, pragmatism differs from its widespread usage among politicians and pundits.

To Peirce, pragmatism was a guiding principle and method of accurate thinking which helps us to “make our ideas clear.” Taking the mutual mediation of theory and praxis, knowledge and action, and facts and values into account,...

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of EducationUniversity of OsloOsloNorway
  2. 2.Philosophy ProgramDeakin UniversityBurwoodAustralia

Section editors and affiliations

  • Torill Strand
    • 1
  • Catherine W. Legg
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of EducationUniversity of OsloOsloNorway
  2. 2.Philosophy ProgramDeakin UniversityBurwoodAustralia