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The Rhetoric of Hungarian Premier Victor Orban: Inside X Outside in the Context of Immigration Crisis

  • Bruno MendelskiEmail author
Reference work entry
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Abstract

This chapter analyzes the impact of the rhetoric of Hungarian premier Viktor Orban on the current wave of refugees in Hungary. Based on the theoretical assumptions of Post-structuralism in International Relations, it examined six Orban discourses in the year 2015 (the apex of the immigration crisis). Methodologically, it relies on Hansen (Security as practice: discourse analysis and the Bosnian War. Routledge, Londres, 2006) model of Discourse Analysis to investigate the process of linking and differentiation that opens space for ethnic or racist discrimination against individuals. It argues that the Hungarian premier presents the issue within a binary framework, with an inside × outside logic. Thus, Orban constructs the Hungarian inside as opposed to a pair of outsiders: the immigrants (primordial outsider) and the EU left-liberal elite (secondary outsider). To the first is given a threatening Muslim identity, while to the second it’s given a religionless, borderless, and nationless identity. Both outsiders are counterpoints with the Hungarian Christian-peaceful identity. The hypothesis of this chapter is that Orban’s inside × outside rhetoric reasserts the importance of the Nation State, updating to the Post-structuralist challenges of the 1990s. The common point between these periods lies in the efforts of political leaders to present themselves as protectors of the inside in the face of (outside) threats, thus legitimizing xenophobic policies towards the foreigner “other.” The new element in this discussion is the affirmation of sovereignty through the questioning of the supranational power of the EU.

Keywords

Hungarian identity European immigration crisis Xenophobia Post structuralism in IR Critical discourse analysis 

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Suggested Readings

  1. Eran S (2019) The ethnic construction of terrorism. In: Naidu V (ed) Racial prejudice and stereotypes. Palgrave Macmillan, LondonGoogle Scholar
  2. Fraser L (2019) Immigration, Borders, and refugees. In: Fraser L (ed) Ethnicity, immigration, and labor. Palgrave Macmillan, LondonGoogle Scholar
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Copyright information

© The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of International Relations (IREL)University of BrasiliaBrasiliaBrazil
  2. 2.International Relations at Department of EconomicsUniversity of Santa Cruz do SulSanta Cruz do SulBrazil

Section editors and affiliations

  • Lyndon Fraser

There are no affiliations available

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