Encyclopedia of Educational Innovation

Living Edition
| Editors: Michael A. Peters, Richard Heraud

Body Percussion as Arts-Based Method

  • Isabella SacramentoEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-13-2262-4_53-1

Introduction

Every person’s body is capable of creating an almost infinite repertoire of different sounds using its diverse parts. Even involuntary human expressions such as sneezing, snoring, and coughing make noises or sounds. Children’s games sometimes involve intricate movements combined with or mimicking their bodies’ counterparts. Throughout life, gestures and sounds acquire meaning, which may eventually crystallize into part of a person’s behavior. Clapping, for example, is probably the most frequent and usual body percussion sound in adult life. It always happens in cheerful, happy moments, when one is among friends, with family, or appreciating demonstrations of enriching art. This can be considered very formulaic since it typically only happens in culturally predetermined moments. It would seem strange in almost any culture if someone clapped randomly in the middle of the street. And yet clapping and other body sounds can be used in innovative ways.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Tao EstrategiaRio de JaneiroBrazil

Section editors and affiliations

  • Tatiana Chemi
    • 1
  1. 1.University of AalborgAalborgDenmark