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Methodological Inventiveness in Writing About Self-Study Research

Inventiveness in Service
  • Kathleen Pithouse-MorganEmail author
  • Anastasia P. Samaras
Living reference work entry
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Part of the Springer International Handbooks of Education book series (SIHE)

Abstract

This chapter portrays the rich history of innovation in the self-study research community by exploring why and how self-study researchers enact methodological inventiveness in composing written accounts of their scholarly work and analysis. Through narrative dialogue, the authors delve into questions of why many self-study researchers perform methodological inventiveness in writing about their research. In addition, the chapter offers four detailed exemplars from South Africa and the USA that demonstrate how emerging self-study scholars have created various inventive and hybrid approaches to best explore, represent, and communicate their research questions using various forms and formats. The chapter closes with a discussion of implications and future possibilities for self-study researchers as they consider their roles and responsibilities with respect to innovative modes and designs in writing about self-study research.

Keywords

Arts Collage Dialogue Metaphor Methodological inventiveness Poetry Photography Research writing Self-portraits Self-study methodology Transdisciplinarity 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We are appreciative of TES project participants – Chris de Beer, Mandisa Dhlula-Moruri, Anita Hiralaal, Lungile Masinga, Refilwe Matebane, and Thelma Rosenberg – for permission to include their comments as contributions to this chapter.

We thank Sifiso Magubane, Arvinder Kaur Johri, Nontuthuko Phewa, and Delia E. Racines for permission to include exemplars based on their original self-study research writing as contributions to this chapter.

We are grateful for the generous permission from Sense Publishers to include the exemplars that draw on two published book chapters: Johri (2015) and Racines and Samaras (2015). We would also like to acknowledge the important role played by Sense Publishers in supporting the development of a substantive body of scholarly work in the field of self-study research.

We are thankful for the unique contributions of all Transformative Education/al Studies (TES) participants and each faculty member who participated in one of the three faculty self-study groups at George Mason University (GMU). These participants helped us to better understand methodological inventiveness in writing about self-study research. In particular, we would like to acknowledge the contributions of the TES project leadership team – Joan Conolly, Liz Harrison, Thenjiwe Meyiwa, Theresa Chisanga, and Delysia Norelle Timm – and the GMU project leadership team: Lynne Scott Constantine, Esperanza Roman Mendoza, Lesley Smith, and Ryan Swanson.

We gratefully acknowledge grant funding for the TES project from the National Research Foundation of South Africa (Education Research in South Africa, grant numbers 74007 and 90380; Incentive Funding for Rated Researchers, grant number 90832), Durban University of Technology’s Research Office, University of KwaZulu-Natal’s University Learning and Teaching Office, and Walter Sisulu University’s Research Office. We further acknowledge that any opinion, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and, therefore, the funders of TES project activities do not accept any liability in regard thereto.

We thank each of the sponsors who supported our work at GMU: the Centre for Teaching and Faculty Excellence – especially Director Kim Eby for her guidance and encouragement; the Office of the Provost and Executive Vice President, Office of Distance Education; and 4-VA that supports innovative faculty development projects in the state. Special thanks to doctoral candidate, Emily K. Christopher, for her important contributions in transcribing the interviews and meetings and for her editorial assistance with this chapter.

Finally, we are very appreciative of the insightful editorial feedback from Shawn Bullock and the professional editing by Moira Richards.

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© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kathleen Pithouse-Morgan
    • 1
    Email author
  • Anastasia P. Samaras
    • 2
  1. 1.School of EducationUniversity of KwaZulu-NatalDurbanSouth Africa
  2. 2.College of Education and Human DevelopmentGeorge Mason UniversityFairfaxUSA

Section editors and affiliations

  • Shawn Michael Bullock

There are no affiliations available

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