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Women’s Political and Economic Participation

  • Marianne Schulze
  • Michaela AmeringEmail author
Reference work entry
  • 8 Downloads
Part of the Mental Health and Illness Worldwide book series (MHIW)

Abstract

The private and public realms of life are in large part culturally defined as female and male, respectively. Various human rights treaties and political agreements call on States to enable women to participate in the male-dominated public sphere. Obstacles abound for girls and women, who find themselves excluded not only because of their gender but also when they experience mental health problems and the perceived consequences, including potential “dangerousness.” Manifold factors play into the state of mental health of girls and women, among them the status quo of gender relations, the interactions with every day life, and the consequences of male-oriented health policies. The latter do not adequately cater to the accessibility needs of girls and women, especially those with mental health problems.

These challenges are magnified in the development context, where the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) aim to ensure that no one is left behind, including girls and women with mental health problems. Humanitarian crises serve as a powerful example of the threats to the lives of girls and women with mental health problems. Against this backdrop, the empowerment of self-advocates, particularly in the context of the negotiations of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, provides a salient counter-narrative.

Keywords

Participation Human rights Women’s rights UN-CRPD Trialogue 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Human Rights ConsultantViennaAustria
  2. 2.Department of Psychiatry and PsychotherapyMedical University of ViennaViennaAustria

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