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New Cultural Histories

  • Lynn FendlerEmail author
Living reference work entry
Part of the Springer International Handbooks of Education book series (SIHE)

Abstract

New cultural histories are critical and interdisciplinary approaches to educational history that align with new materialist scholarship after the linguistic turn. Because of its broad challenges to conventional historiography, the premises of new cultural history are not widely accepted among historians. This chapter maps the conditions for the emergence of new cultural history and explicates ways new cultural histories are distinct from other approaches to historiography. The chapter offers several examples of new cultural history in the broad sense and in educational history more specifically. The chapter ends by offering some possibilities for future developments of new cultural history in educational studies.

Keywords

Historiography Michel Foucault Literary influences New materialism Research methodologies Problematization 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Michigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA

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