Encyclopedia of Food and Agricultural Ethics

2019 Edition
| Editors: David M. Kaplan

Food and Drugs

  • Joseph A. TuminelloIIIEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-024-1179-9_562

Synonyms

Introduction

Assumptions regarding the relationship between the ontological categories of “food” and “drug” undergird a substantial amount of academic discourse and also function as key components in worldviews beyond the academy. Despite the prevalence of these ontological assumptions, little work has been done in foregrounding them to allow for critique and consideration of alternative perspectives. This entry provides an overview of this emerging discussion within food ontology, as well as various perspectives on the food-drug relationship and ethical implications of these views. The term “drug” is employed to refer to a broader category of substances which encompasses “medicine” while also including substances used for recreational, religious, and other nonmedical purposes (e.g., drugs in the detrimental/addictive sense).

Food and Drug Ontology in the Philosophy of Food

While philosophers have paid an...
This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access.

References

  1. Blass, E. M. (2012). Phylogenetic and ontogenetic contributions to today’s obesity quagmire. In K. D. Brownell & M. S. Gold (Eds.), Food and addiction: A comprehensive handbook (pp. 172–177). New York: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Blumenthal, D. M., & Gold, M. S. (2012). Relationships between drugs of abuse and eating. In K. D. Brownell & M. S. Gold (Eds.), Food and addiction: A comprehensive handbook (pp. 254–265). New York: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Brownell, K. D., & Gold, M. S. (2012). Food and addiction: Scientific, social, legal, and legislative implications. In K. D. Brownell & M. S. Gold (Eds.), Food and addiction: A comprehensive handbook (pp. 438–446). New York: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Chen, N. N. (2009). Food, medicine, and the quest for good health: Nutrition, medicine, and culture. New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
  5. Etkin, N. L. (2006). Edible medicines: An ethnopharmacology of food. Tucson: University of Arizona Press.Google Scholar
  6. Etkin, N. L., & Ross, P. J. (1982). Food as medicine and medicine as food: An adaptive framework for the interpretation of plant utilization among the Hausa of Northern Nigeria. Social Science & Medicine, 16, 1559–1573.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Gold, S. S. (2011). The good girl’s drug: How to stop using food to control your feelings. New York: Berkley Books.Google Scholar
  8. Grewal, J. (2016). Is cooking the future of medicine?, Yes! Magazine. Retrieved from http://www.yesmagazine.org/people-power/is-cooking-the-future-of-medicine-20160208. Accessed 16 May 2016.
  9. Haddock, C. K., & Dill, P. (2000). The effects of food on mood and behavior: Implications for the addictions model of obesity and eating disorders. In W. S. C. Poston II & C. K. Haddock (Eds.), Food as a drug (pp. 17–47). Binghamton: Haworth Press.Google Scholar
  10. Kaplan, D. M. (2007). What’s wrong with functional foods? Journal of Philosophical Research, 32, 177–187.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Kaplan, D. M. (2012). Introduction. In D. M. Kaplan (Ed.), The philosophy of food (pp. 1–23). Berkeley: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  12. Lustig, R., Schmidt, L., & Brindis, C. (2012). The toxic truth about sugar. Nature, 482, 27–29.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Mintz, S. W., & Du Bois, C. M. (2002). The anthropology of food and eating. Annual Review of Anthropology, 31, 99–119.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Pieroni, A., & Price, L. L. (2006). Introduction. In A. Pieroni & L. L. Price (Eds.), Eating and healing: Traditional food as medicine (pp. 1–10). Binghamton: Haworth Press.Google Scholar
  15. Poston, W. S. C., II, & Haddock, C. K. (2000). Preface. In W. S. C. Poston II & C. K. Haddock (Eds.), Food as a drug (pp. xv–xix). Binghamton: Haworth Press.Google Scholar
  16. Rastogi, S. (2014). Preface. In S. Rastogi (Ed.), Ayurvedic science of food and nutrition (pp. Vii–viii). New York: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Rodale, J. I. (1968). Natural health, sugar, and the criminal mind. New York: Pyramid Publications.Google Scholar
  18. Scrinis, G. (2012). Nutritionism and functional foods. In D. M. Kaplan (Ed.), The philosophy of food (pp. 269–291). Berkeley: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  19. Sesikeran, B. (2014). Foreword. In S. Rastogi (Ed.), Ayurvedic science of food and nutrition (pp. v–vi). New York: Springer.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature B.V. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Philosophy and ReligionUniversity of North TexasDentonUSA