Encyclopedia of Food and Agricultural Ethics

2019 Edition
| Editors: David M. Kaplan

Food Security and International Trade

  • Ryan CardwellEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-024-1179-9_378

Synonyms

Introduction

International trade has the potential to significantly affect food security outcomes. Changing production and consumption patterns that result from increased international trade flows affect income levels and income distribution, which are the fundamental determinants of food security. The debate over the role of international trade in food security is often framed as a debate over the ethics of international trade; such a framework misdirects the debate onto an unproductive path. There is (almost) universal agreement on the objective of universal food security, and there is very little gray area in the ethics surrounding this objective. The debate about international trade’s role in achieving food security is more productively framed as a debate over the effects of international trade on food security. These effects are complex and difficult to identify, however, and most studies do not provide...

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature B.V. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Agribusiness and Agricultural EconomicsUniversity of ManitobaWinnipegCanada