Encyclopedia of Food and Agricultural Ethics

2019 Edition
| Editors: David M. Kaplan

Food, Agriculture, and Trade Organizations

  • Carmen BainEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-024-1179-9_181

Synonyms

Introduction

Trade organizations establish and enforce the rules of trade. The exemplary example of such an organization is the World Trade Organization (WTO). Established in 1995, the WTO marked the first time that an international organization had the legal mandate to regulate trade between nations, a role previously under the purview of individual nations. The objective of the WTO is to replace national trade rules, such as tariffs and quotas, and prohibit nontariff trade barriers, such as technical barriers or rules of origin, with a single institutional framework designed to allow trade to flow “as smoothly, predictably, and freely as possible” (World Trade Organization 2013). Changes wrought by the WTO led to the deepening of market relations globally, including the expansion of global value chains (GVC), where production is integrated from start to finish (Busch and Bain 2004; Bair 2009). Here, large-scale...

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature B.V. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of SociologyIowa State UniversityAmesUSA