Hinduism and Tribal Religions

Living Edition
| Editors: Pankaj Jain, Rita Sherma, Madhu Khanna

Kāvērī

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-024-1036-5_64-1

Introduction

Praised as South India’s greatest river, Kāvērī is known for its traditional sanctity, fertile agricultural lands, dynastic temples on its banks, and its religious status. It has nurtured a rich tradition of music, art, literature, and architecture [1].

The Demography of Kāvērī

The primary source of the river Kāvērī is at Talakāvērī in the Kodagu District of Karnataka. The river which emerges as a spring in Talakāvērī flows southeast through the States of Karnataka, Tamil Nadu, and Kerala [12]. The river with a catchment area of 72,000 km2 generates ten tributary rivers: Hemavati, Shimsha, Honnuhole, Arkavathy, Kabini, Lakshmana Tirtha, Lokapavani, Bhavai, Amaravati, and Noyyal, running to a span of about 765 km [7]. Of the Kāvērī river basin, 41.2% is in Karnataka, 55.5% in Tamil Nadu, and 3.3% in Kerala [8]. There are about six big dams and numerous canals built on the river to control the flow of the water for irrigation and industrial purposes. The first dam to be...

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Humanities and Social SciencesBirla Institute of Technology and Science Pilani K. K. Birla Goa CampusZuarinagarIndia