International Higher Education Development Aid, Possibilities and Pitfalls

  • Richard R. HopperEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-017-9553-1_285-1

Synonyms

Definition

Development aid for higher education essentially consists of international investments in the expansion and reform of higher education systems and institutions in developing countries. Institutional autonomy refers to the right of an institution to determine its content and method of instruction, missional priorities, organizational structure, budget, and/or personnel. Accreditation refers to the quality assurance process in which institutions are assessed against a wide range of prescribed standards of academic quality.

Introduction

Development aid for higher education essentially consists of international investments in the expansion and reform of higher education systems and institutions in developing countries. Such investments are made predominantly by multilateral agencies, bi-lateral agencies, and large nonprofits. The objectives are generally to expand the higher education sector, improve learning and labor...

This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access.

References

  1. Altbach, P., D. Boom, R. Hopper, G. Psacharapoulos, and H. Rosovsky. 2004. Moderated discussion: The task force on higher education and society, Comparative education review. Vol. 48, 70–88. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  2. ECOSOC/UNDP. 2015. UN system task team on the post-2015 UN development Agenda. Education and skills for inclusive and sustainable development beyond 2015. New York: United Nations.Google Scholar
  3. Hopper, Richard. 2002. Implementation completion report: On a credit in the amount of US$ 6.6 million to the Republic of Guinea for a higher education management support project. Washington, DC: The World Bank. (English and French).Google Scholar
  4. Hopper, Richard. 2004. Implementation completion report: On a loan in the amount of US$71.2 million to the Republic of Indonesia for a quality of undergraduate education project. Washington, DC: The World Bank.Google Scholar
  5. Hopper, Richard. 2007. Building capacity in quality assurance: The challenge of context. In Cross-border tertiary education: A way towards capacity development, ed. OECD/World Bank. Paris: OECD.Google Scholar
  6. Hopper, Richard, Jamil Salmi, and Roberta Malee Bassett. 2008. Transforming higher education in developing countries: The role of the World Bank. In International organizations and higher education policy, ed. R. Basset and A. Maldonado. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  7. Salmi, Jamil, and Richard Hopper, eds. 2002. Constructing knowledge societies: New challenges for tertiary education. Washington, DC: The World Bank.Google Scholar
  8. Schleicher, Andreas, and Richard Hopper, eds. 2010. Strong performers and successful reformers in education: Lessons from PISA for the United States. Paris: OECD Directorate for Education.Google Scholar
  9. Tan, Jee-Peng, Kiong Hock Lee, Ryan Flynn, Viviana V. Roseth, and Yoo-Jeung Joy Nam. 2016. Workforce development in emerging economies: Comparative perspectives on institutions, praxis, and policies. Directions in development – Human development. Washington, DC: The World Bank.Google Scholar
  10. The World Bank, ed. 2014. Workforce development: Matching education systems to workforce needs, SABER in action. Washington, DC: The World Bank.Google Scholar
  11. The World Bank, ed. 2017. Romania workforce development: SABER country report 2017, Systems approach for better education results. Washington, DC: The World Bank.Google Scholar
  12. Wahba, Moustafa Mohamed Moustafa. 2016. Technical and vocational education and training (TVET) challenges and priorities in developing countries. Paris: UNESCO.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Kennebec Valley Community CollegeFairfieldUSA

Section editors and affiliations

  • Hans De Wit
    • 1
  • Laura Rumbley
    • 2
  • Fiona Hunter
    • 3
  • Lisa Unangst
    • 4
  • Edward Choi
    • 5
  1. 1.Center for International Higher EducationBoston CollegeBostonUSA
  2. 2.Center for International Higher EducationBoston CollegeChestnut HillUSA
  3. 3.Centre for Higher Education InternationalisationUniversità Cattolica del Sacro CuoreMilanoItaly
  4. 4.Center for International Higher EducationBoston CollegeChestnut HillU.S.A.
  5. 5.Center for International Higher EducationBoston CollegeChestnut HillU.S.A.