International Higher Education Partnerships in the Developing World

  • Cornelius Hagenmeier
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-017-9553-1_279-1

Synonyms

Definitions

International Higher Education Partnerships can in the absence of a universally accepted definition be understood as any formal or informal working together of higher education entities in pursuit of common goals (Maringe and de Wit 2016) across international borders. Collaboration in higher education is a key aspect of internationalization and of specific relevance to the developing world. It encompasses alliances in which partners are exclusively situated in developing countries (South-South partnerships) as well as those including partners both in the developed and developing world (North-South partnerships). The concept includes partnerships which consist exclusively of higher education institutions, as well as those established between funding agencies and higher education institutions, and those formed with donor assistance. A...

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cornelius Hagenmeier
    • 1
  1. 1.University of the Free StateBloemfonteinSouth Africa

Section editors and affiliations

  • Hans De Wit
    • 1
  • Laura Rumbley
    • 2
  • Fiona Hunter
    • 3
  • Lisa Unangst
    • 4
  • Edward Choi
    • 5
  1. 1.Center for International Higher EducationBoston CollegeBostonUSA
  2. 2.Center for International Higher EducationBoston CollegeChestnut HillUSA
  3. 3.Centre for Higher Education InternationalisationUniversità Cattolica del Sacro CuoreMilanoItaly
  4. 4.Center for International Higher EducationBoston CollegeChestnut HillU.S.A.
  5. 5.Center for International Higher EducationBoston CollegeChestnut HillU.S.A.