Language and Internationalization of the Higher Education Curriculum

  • Amanda C. MurphyEmail author
  • Francesca Costa
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-017-9553-1_223-1

Synonyms

Definition

Internationalization of the curriculum

“Internationalization of the Curriculum is the incorporation of international, intercultural, and/or global dimensions into the content of the curriculum as well as the learning outcomes, assessment tasks, teaching methods, and support services of a program of study.” Leask (2015:23)

Englishization

The spread of English as medium of instruction in institutions of higher education in non-English-speaking countries.

Language policy

A policy adopted either officially through legislation or court decisions to determine how languages are used, to cultivate language skills needed to meet national priorities or to establish the rights of individuals or groups to use and maintain languages.

In 2005, Gacel-Ávila (Gacel-Ávila 2005:123) questioned whether the characteristics of an internationalized curriculum designed to educate global and...

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Centre of Higher Education InternationalisationUniversità Cattolica del Sacro CuoreMilanItaly
  2. 2.Centre of Higher Education InternationalisationUniversità degli Studi di BergamoMilanItaly

Section editors and affiliations

  • Hans de Wit
    • 1
  • Laura Rumbley
    • 2
  • Fiona Hunter
    • 3
  • Lisa Unangst
    • 4
  • Edward Choi
    • 5
  1. 1.Center for International Higher EducationBoston CollegeBostonUSA
  2. 2.Center for International Higher EducationBoston CollegeChestnut HillUSA
  3. 3.Centre for Higher Education InternationalisationUniversità Cattolica del Sacro CuoreMilanoItaly
  4. 4.Center for International Higher EducationBoston CollegeChestnut HillU.S.A.
  5. 5.Center for International Higher EducationBoston CollegeChestnut HillU.S.A.