Encyclopedia of the Philosophy of Law and Social Philosophy

Living Edition
| Editors: Mortimer Sellers, Stephan Kirste

Sunstein, Cass

  • Joseph PostellEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-6730-0_309-1

Introduction

Cass Sunstein (1954–present) is an American legal scholar and theorist who, in addition to his academic work, served as the Administrator of the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs under President Barack Obama. He is considered the most famous and widely-published left-leaning legal scholar of this generation. His work in constitutional and administrative law, as well as his scholarship in behavioral law and economics, is widely read and cited by American legal scholars. A 2015 study of law school faculty found that Sunstein was the most widely-cited legal scholar in public law by a nearly 2-1 margin.

Sunstein’s primary scholarly contributions have connected political and constitutional theory to contemporary questions about the scope of government regulation, the purpose of regulation, and the institutional approaches that best promote good regulation. His work also addresses the theory and practice of democratic government, particularly in the age of mass media.

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References

  1. Sunstein CR (1993a) After the rights revolution: reconceiving the regulatory state. Harvard University Press, CambridgeGoogle Scholar
  2. Sunstein CR (1993b) The partial constitution. Harvard University Press, CambridgeGoogle Scholar
  3. Sunstein CR (2002a) Designing democracy: what constitutions do. Oxford University Press, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  4. Sunstein CR (2002b) Risk and reason: safety, law, and the environment. Cambridge University Press, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  5. Sunstein CR (2006) The second bill of rights: FDR’s unfinished revolution and why we need it more than ever. Basic Books, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  6. Sunstein CR (2009) A constitution of many minds: why the founding document doesn’t mean what it meant before. Princeton University Press, PrincetonCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Sunstein CR (2013) Simpler: the future of government. Simon & Schuster, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  8. Sunstein CR, Thaler RH (2008) Nudge: improving decisions about health, wealth, and happiness. Penguin, New YorkGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature B.V. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of Colorado-Colorado SpringsColorado SpringsUSA

Section editors and affiliations

  • Sally Scholz
    • 1
  1. 1.Philosophy DepartmentVillanova UniversityVillanovaUSA