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Orthophytum BROMELIACEAE

  • U. EggliEmail author
  • E. J. Gouda
Living reference work entry
Part of the Illustrated Handbook of Succulent Plants book series (SUCCPLANTS)

Abstract

A diagnostic description of the genus is given with special emphasis on the occurrence of succulence amongst its species. The geographical distribution is outlined, together with a selection of important literature, and an explanation of the etymology of the name. This is followed by a short summary of its position in the phylogeny of the family and of the past and present classification in a phylogenetic context. The succulent features present amongst the species of the genus are shortly explained as to morphology and anatomy.

This is followed by a synoptical treatment of the succulent species of the genus, complete with typification details, full synonymy, geographical and ecological data, a diagnostic description, and, where applicable, notes on phylogenetic placement and relationships, as well as economic and/or horticultural importance.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Sukkulenten-Sammlung ZürichGrün Stadt ZürichZürichSwitzerland
  2. 2.Curator University Botanic GardensUtrechtNetherlands

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