Encyclopedia of Continuum Mechanics

Living Edition
| Editors: Holm Altenbach, Andreas Öchsner

Crashworthiness

  • Jacobo DíazEmail author
  • Miguel Costas
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-662-53605-6_223-1

Synonyms

Definition

Crashworthiness is the ability of a structure to protect its contents (occupants or cargo) during an impact. The term usually refers to the capacity of a structural system to dissipate kinetic impact energy by itself, by means of a controlled and predictable deformation. Thus, the kinetic energy is transformed into inelastic strain energy, heat, and fracture energy.

Crashworthiness performance is one of the main drivers in automotive design nowadays, and its importance is considerable also in aircraft and railway transportation. The safety of a vehicle is affected by multiple factors, components, and systems. Among them, those involved in preventing and avoiding accidents, or reducing their severity, are encompassed under the category of active safety. On the other hand, passive safety refers to vehicle elements that mitigate the consequences of an accident, such as occupant retention systems,...

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Group of Structural Mechanics, School of Civil EngineeringUniversidade da CoruñaA CoruñaSpain
  2. 2.SFI-CASA, Centre for Advanced Structural Analysis, Department of Structural EngineeringNorwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)TrondheimNorway

Section editors and affiliations

  • F. Teixeira-Dias
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Infrastructure and Environment (IIE), School of EngineeringThe University of EdinburghEdinburghUK