CIRP Encyclopedia of Production Engineering

2019 Edition
| Editors: Sami Chatti, Luc Laperrière, Gunther Reinhart, Tullio Tolio

Surface Texture Filtering

  • Xiangqian JiangEmail author
  • Paul J Scott
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-662-53120-4_16863

Synonyms

Definition

A filter separates the small-scale texture from the larger-scale texture in a surface. The value of the scale at the defined separation is called the nesting index although other names are used for specific filters (e.g., cut-off for linear filters).

Scale can be defined in terms of: wavelength for linear filters, size of the structuring element (e.g., radius of a disk) for morphological filters. In Segmentation filters, the scale can be: the height difference between the highest (or lowest) points in the interior and on the boundary of a segment, the area of a segment, length of the boundary of a segment, etc.

Theory and Application

Introduction

Filtration has always been important in surface metrology: It is the means by which the surface features of interest are extracted from the measured data for further analysis.

The first filters started with the fully analogue 2CR filter implemented as a two-stage...
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References

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Copyright information

© CIRP 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Centre for Precision TechnologiesUniversity of HuddersfieldHuddersfieldUK

Section editors and affiliations

  • Han Haitjema
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Mechanical EngineeringKU LeuvenLeuvenBelgium