CIRP Encyclopedia of Production Engineering

2019 Edition
| Editors: Sami Chatti, Luc Laperrière, Gunther Reinhart, Tullio Tolio

Surface Texture

  • Richard LeachEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-662-53120-4_16799

Definition

Surface texture is the geometrical irregularities present at a surface. Surface texture does not include those geometrical irregularities contributing to the form or shape of the surface.

Theory and Application

Most manufactured parts rely on some form of control of their surface characteristics. The surface is usually defined as the feature on a component or device that interacts with the environment, in which the component is housed or in which the device operates, or with another surface (Leach et al. 2014). The surface topography, and of course the material characteristics, of a part can affect how two bearing parts slide together, how fluids interact with the part, or how the part looks and feels (Bruzzone et al. 2008; Thomas 2014).

Surface topography is defined (in Leach 2014) as the overall surface structure of a part (i.e., all the surface features treated as a continuum of spatial wavelengths), surface form as the underlying shape of a part (e.g., a cylinder liner...

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References

  1. Bruzzone AAG, Costa HL, Lonardo PM, Lucca DA (2008) Advances in engineering surfaces for functional performance. Ann CIRP 57:750–769CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. ISO 4287 (1997) Geometrical product specification (GPS) – surface texture: profile method – terms, definitions and surface texture parameters. International Organization of Standardization, GenevaGoogle Scholar
  3. ISO 4288 (1996) Geometrical product specification (GPS) – surface texture: profile method – rules and procedures for the assessment of surface texture. International Organization of Standardization, GenevaGoogle Scholar
  4. ISO 16610 part 21 (2011) Geometrical product specifications (GPS) – filtration – part 21: linear profile filters: gaussian filters. International Organization of Standardization, GenevaGoogle Scholar
  5. ISO 25178 part 2 (2012) Geometrical product specification (GPS) – surface texture: areal – part 2: terms, definitions and surface texture parameters. International Organization for Standardization, GenevaGoogle Scholar
  6. ISO 25178 part 3 (2012) Geometrical product specification (GPS) – surface texture: areal – part 3: specification operators. International Organization for Standardization, GenevaGoogle Scholar
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  9. Leach RK (2014) Fundamental principles of engineering nanometrology, vol 2. Elsevier, AmsterdamGoogle Scholar
  10. Leach RK, Weckenmann A, Coupland JM, Hartmann W (2014) Interpreting the probe-surface interaction of surface measuring instruments, or what is a surface? Surf Topogr Metrol Prop 2:035001CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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Copyright information

© CIRP 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Mechanical, Materials and Manufacturing EngineeringUniversity of NottinghamNottinghamUK