CIRP Encyclopedia of Production Engineering

2019 Edition
| Editors: Sami Chatti, Luc Laperrière, Gunther Reinhart, Tullio Tolio

Grinding Machines

  • Konrad WegenerEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-662-53120-4_16787

Synonyms

Definition

A grinding machine is a machine for material removal with geometrically non-defined, bonded cutting edges, where the relative movement between tool and workpiece is rotational or linear. The machine further must provide relative feed and positioning movements between tool and workpiece. The movements between tool support (spindle) and workpiece follow a defined geometrical path – it is path defined.

Material removal with geometrical non-defined cutting edges is considered as material removal that is made by a large number of cutting edges normally on abrasive grains, which are undefined, with respect to number, shape, and/or position, where the envelope over all stochastically distributed cutting edges defines the tool geometry.

Grinding with linear relative movement is called pitch grinding. If the reciprocating linear movement is coupled with a continuous rotational movement, the process is called honing. Belt grinders, where a belt to which the abrasive...

This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access.

References

  1. Adams General Power GmbH (2015) Milling- Boring- Turning- Grinding Centers FDS. http://www.adams-tec.com/Produkte/produkte.html. Accessed 9 Mar 2015
  2. Blohm Jung GmbH, United Grinding Group (2014) Presentation. Blohm Jung GmbH, HamburgGoogle Scholar
  3. DIN 8580 (2003) Fertigungsverfahren – Begriffe, Einteilung [Manufacturing processes – terms and definitions, classification]. Beuth, Berlin. (in German)Google Scholar
  4. DIN 8589-0 (2003-09) Fertigungsverfahren Spanen – Teil 0: Allgemeines – Einordnung, Unterteilung, Begriffe [Manufacturing processes chip removal – Part 0: general – classification, subdivision, terms and definitions]. Beuth, Berlin. (in German)Google Scholar
  5. DIN 8589-11 (2003-09) Fertigungsverfahren Spanen – Teil 11: Schleifen mit rotierendem Werkzeug: Einordnung, Unterteilung, Begriffe [Manufacturing processes chip removal – Part 11: grinding with rotating tool – classification, subdivision, terms and definitions]. Beuth, Berlin. (in German)Google Scholar
  6. DIN 8589-12 (2003-09) Fertigungsverfahren Spanen – Teil 12: Bandschleifen; Einordnung, Unterteilung, Begriffe [Manufacturing processes chip removal – Part 12: belt grinding – classification, subdivision, terms and definitions]. Beuth, Berlin. (in German)Google Scholar
  7. DIN 8589-13 (2003-09): Fertigungsverfahren Spanen – Teil 13: Hubschleifen; Einordnung, Unterteilung, Begriffe [Manufacturing processes chip removal – Part 13: honing with linear cutting motion – classification, subdivision, terms and definitions]. Beuth, Berlin. (in German)Google Scholar
  8. Hashimoto F, Gallego I, Oliveira JG, Barrenetxea D, Takahashi M, Sakakibara K, Stalfelt H-O, Staadt G, Ogawa K (2012) Advances in centerless grinding technology. Ann CIRP 61(2):747–770CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Heisel U, Klocke F, Uhlmann E, Spur G (2014) Handbuch Spanen [Handbook chip removal]. Carl Hanser, MünchenGoogle Scholar
  10. ISO 4703 (2001) Test conditions for surface grinding machines with two columns – machines for grinding slideways – testing of the accuracy. Beuth, BerlinGoogle Scholar
  11. ISO 841 (2001) Industrial automation systems – physical device control – coordinate system and motion nomenclature. Beuth, BerlinGoogle Scholar
  12. Reishauer AG (2014) RZ 60 bis RZ 360 Wälzschleifmaschine, Stand der Technik beim Reishauer Wälzschleifen. Reishauer AG, WallisellenGoogle Scholar
  13. Rollomatic AG (2010) Product presentation of GrindSmart®620XS. Rollomatic AG/Le Landeron, SwitzerlandGoogle Scholar
  14. Studer AG, United Grinding Group (2014) Presentation. Studer, HamburgGoogle Scholar
  15. Weck M, Brecher C (2005) Werkzeugmaschinen 1: Maschinenarten und Anwendungsbereiche [Machine Tools 1: types of machine tools and range of application]. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg. (in German)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© CIRP 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institut für Werkzeugmaschinen und Fertigung (IWF)ETH ZürichZürichSwitzerland