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Student Feedback in Mobile Teaching and Learning

  • Yu (Aimee) ZhangEmail author
Living reference work entry

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Abstract

Mobile learning is believed to be the trend for future education. It provides real-time, rich content, interactive, teamwork, and work-integrated learning to learners anytime and anywhere (see “Characteristics of Mobile Teaching and Learning”). It makes flexible personal learning available to meet the needs for new generation of students and students with special needs (e.g., disabled students or gifted students). It also gives opportunities for effective educators and important teaching materials to reach thousands of learners all over the world. However, mobile learning has also been criticized because it lacks personal contact, body and facial languages, and the ability to control the quality of teaching. Many empirical studies have focused on the differences between online or mobile learning and traditional learning methods, focusing on what can be enhanced for new developed blended learning or mobile learning programs. One such program is Tutors in Pockets, a mobile learning assistance program aimed to assist in student learning for economic subjects (see “Tutors in Pockets for Economics”). This study collected primary data from both Australia and China to identify the students’ attitude toward mobile learning, their patterns of use, and learning patterns on mobile devices. In addition, the user experience and expected benefits from Tutors in Pockets were investigated. The first section of this chapter introduces mobile learning and its characteristics. Previous empirical findings are summarized in the second section by comparing the advantages and disadvantages for mobile learning to traditional learning methods. The third section discusses the design of this study and the mobile program implemented in a basic macroeconomics course – Tutors in Pockets. The fourth section presents the sample collected from Australia and China and how the data were analyzed. The last section summarizes the study’s findings and provides suggestions for future mobile teaching and learning programs.

Keywords

Mobile teaching Mobile learning Student survey Student feedback Mobile application Educational application 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.WEMOSOFTWollongongAustralia

Section editors and affiliations

  • Raeal J. Moore
    • 1
  1. 1.Research DivisionACT, IncIowa CityUSA

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