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Historical Measures of Economic Output

  • Alexander J. FieldEmail author
Living reference work entry

Abstract

Following an introduction this chapter provides an overview of the logic and conceptual underpinnings of national income and product measures (Part I). Part II describes developments beginning in the 1930s that led to the modern approaches and conventions regarding how we should measure these aggregates. Part III reviews contributions made by quantitative economists, new economic historians, and cliometricians to our understanding of economic epochs prior to the second half of the twentieth century. The principal focus is on the United States, although there is some reference to developments in other countries.

Keywords

National income National product Economic growth National income and product accounting The United States 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of EconomicsSanta Clara UniversitySanta ClaraUSA

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