Encyclopedia of Psychology and Religion

Living Edition
| Editors: David A. Leeming

Orthodox Christianity

  • Thomas Cattoi
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27771-9_200126-1

Orthodox Christianity is the second largest branch of the Christian tradition, composed of a number of national and local churches. These churches are held together “not by a centralized government, not by a single prelate wielding power over the whole body, but by the double bond of unity in the faith and communion in the sacraments” (Ware 1997a). Currently, Orthodox Christianity comprises the four ancient Patriarchates of Constantinople, Alexandria, Antioch, and Jerusalem, whose roots go back to the first centuries of the Christian era, and in the order of their historical recognition, the ten autocephalous (self-governing) churches of Russia, Serbia, Romania, Bulgaria, Georgia, Cyprus, Greece, Poland, Albania, and the Czech lands and Slovakia. As of 2018, the claim to autocephaly of the Orthodox Church of America (OCA) continues to be disputed. While no official data exist, Orthodox Christianity claims between 250 and 300 million followers. More than half of all Orthodox faithful...

This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access.

Bibliography

  1. Larchet, J.-C. (2005). Mental disorders & spiritual healing: Teachings from the early Christian east. Tacoma: Angelico Press.Google Scholar
  2. Palmer, G. E. H., Sherrard, P., & Ware, T. (1979–1992). Philokalia. Compiled by St. Nikodimos of the Holy Mountain and St. Markarios of Corinth. London: Farrar, Straus and Giroux.Google Scholar
  3. Pelikan, J. (1975). The Christian tradition: A history of the development of doctrine, vol. 1: The emergence of the Catholic tradition (100–600). Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  4. Ware, T. (1997). The Orthodox Church. London: Penguin Books.Google Scholar

Further Reading

  1. Pelikan, J. (1975). The Christian tradition: A history of the development of doctrine, vol. 1: The emergence of the Catholic tradition (100–600). Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  2. Ware, T. (1997). The Orthodox Church. London: Penguin Books.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Jesuit School of Theology at Santa Clara University and Graduate Theological UnionBerkeleyUSA